Posts for category: Child Health Care

By Clearwater Pediatric Care
May 20, 2019
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Asthma  

When it comes to asthma, close monitoring at home, at a school physical and by your Westchase pediatrician, is key to managing this Asthmaserious respiratory disease. At Clearwater Pediatric Care, Drs. Raj Pai, Mary Ann Hicks, Sheila Mak, Emily Jones and Seema Kubarek want parents and children fully informed for the best possible health outcomes. Here are answers to some of the most frequently asked questions they encounter regarding asthma.

FAQs about asthma

What is asthma, and how did my child get it? Asthma is a chronic lung disease. Influenced by heredity, allergies, stress and environmental factors asthma is the most serious chronic health condition suffered by children, says the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Asthma is not communicable, as is a cold or the flu, but expresses itself over time, particularly as a triggers, such as pollen, exercise, tobacco smoke or cold weather, cross a child's path.

What are the symptoms of asthma? Coughing, particularly at night, wheezing, shortness of breath and chest tightness are typical symptoms. They vary in severity and thankfully, may be controlled by avoiding known triggers and using prescribed medications.

How is asthma diagnosed? Your pediatrician in Westchase, you as the parent, or perhaps a nurse during a school physical may notice symptoms. Your child's doctor will listen to his or her breath sounds with a stethoscope and perform lung function tests such as spirometry. The pediatrician may order lab work and allergy tests, too.

Since asthma cannot be cured, can it be controlled? The answer is a definite yes. In fact, most children with asthma lead full and active lives. Medications--both rescue inhalers for sudden symptoms and long-term control prescriptions--increase lung function, allowing for full excursion of air, less coughing and fewer episodes of fatigue.

What is an asthma action plan? As reported by Kids Health, an asthma action plan is a written tool which helps parents and children manage symptoms as they occur. Formulated with the guidance of your pediatrician, the plan outlines how to respond to escalating symptoms, what medications to administer, when to go to the doctor's office or hospital ER and more. This tool accompanies a child to school, daycare, camp and other areas outside the home so that everyone who plays an active role in your child's day to day life knows how to help him or her with asthma symptoms.

Know more for better health

The Centers for Disease Control states that 8.3 percent of American children deal with asthma. At Clearwater Pediatric Care and Westchase Pediatric Care, the doctors and their support staff work diligently to education parents and children about this chronic lung problem. The result is active, happy, healthy kids. If you have questions about childhood asthma, please contact one of our two offices. We'll be happy to help. In Clearwater, FL, phone (727) 461-1543, and in Westchase, FL, call (813) 818-1543.

By Clearwater Pediatric Care
September 06, 2017
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Bedwetting  

Bedwetting is a common childhood problem. Many children who master toilet training during the day, usually between the ages of two and four, continue to experience episodes of bedwetting through the night. In many cases, the nighttime bedwetting incidents will gradually decrease until they have completely ceased around the age of five or six.

So, when should parents worry about their child’s bedwetting behaviors? Most pediatricians agree that it’s quite normal for children to experience occasional “accidents” and that most children will outgrow it on their own.

When to Visit Your Pediatrician

Bedwetting is rarely a serious problem. In fact, wetting up to a year after the child has successfully been toilet trained is normal. Children gain bladder control at different ages, and while most kids quit wetting at night by the age of 6, others may take a little longer. In the majority of cases, wetting does not have a medical cause.

According to the AAP, you should contact your pediatrician if your child continues to have frequent “accidents” or if you notice any of the following signs:

  • Wet clothing and bed linens, even when the child uses the toilet frequently
  • Unusual straining during urination, a very small or narrow stream of urine, or dribbling after urination
  • Cloudy or pink urine
  • Abnormal redness or rash in the genital area
  • Trying to conceal wetting by hiding clothes or underwear
  • Daytime wetting in addition to nighttime accidents

Parents should remember to be sensitive to their child’s wetting behavior so not to cause additional embarrassment or discomfort. Never punish the child for bedwetting. Instead, show support and encouragement by reassuring the child that it is not his or her fault and that the problem will get better.

Remember, even though childhood wetting is frustrating, it is very normal. Talk to your pediatrician if you have concerns about your child’s bedwetting behaviors. 

By Clearwater Pediatric Care
May 16, 2017
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Asthma  

Child AsthmaA common condition seen in kids and teens, asthma is a lung condition that causes trouble breathing and shortness of breath. During an attack, the bronchial airways become inflamed and the muscles surrounding them constrict, making breathing difficult. Repeated attacks may cause permanent lung damage and in severe cases can be life-threatening. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, more than 23 million Americans have the condition and more than one-quarter of them are children under the age of 18.

Asthma Causes

There are a variety of triggers that can lead to an asthma flare-up or make asthma worse. These vary for every person, but common triggers include:

  • Allergens, such as animal dander, pollens, mold and house dust mites
  • Environmental irritants, such as cigarettes, dry air, fragrances and air pollution
  • Infections, such as pneumonia, sinus infection and viral infections of the nose and throat
  • Exercise
  • Stress

Does my child have asthma?

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, asthma is the most common chronic medical problem in children. Asthma symptoms will vary in frequency and severity, and most children with asthma develop their first symptoms before the age of five.  Common signs include:

  • Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Tightness in chest

If you think your child may have asthma, contact your pediatrician. They can help you identify the early signs of childhood asthma and provide support for prevention and treatment.

A child may be at a greater risk for having asthma if there is a family history of asthma or if the child has eczema or frequent bouts of chronic lower respiratory problems occurring before the first birthday.  Keeping your kids away from cigarette smoke in the home or car, removing pets from the house, paying attention to pollen and air quality forecasts and monitoring exercise are all ways to reduce asthma problems.  

The good news is that the majority of asthma cases are only mild, and when the condition is properly managed with medications and extra caution, severe asthma flare-ups can be prevented.  Work with your child’s pediatrician to learn more about the condition and ensure your child leads a healthy, normal, active life.